Cut Line Straits Shooting

By Rex HoggardAugust 20, 2010, 9:47 pm
As the golf world continues to digest “bunker-gate” and one of the strangest major finishes in history (non-Carnoustie division), Herb Kohler’s Wisconsin wonderland shares the dubious “’Missed Cut” spotlight this week with the PGA Tour, which seems poised to pull the plug on the circuit’s preeminent island getaway in Hilton Head.

Made Cut

Dustin Johnson. It took Roberto De Vicenzo the better part of 40 years to get over his scorecard gaffe at the 1968 Masters, telling “Cut Line” a few years ago, “For 40 years (the mistake) made me cry. Now it makes me smile.”

Our gut tells us it won’t take the hard-swinging Johnson that long, particularly considering how he reacted in the hectic moments following one of the most surreal major finishes since Jean Van de Velde waded into a chilly Scottish burn.

“Obviously I know the Rules of Golf, and I can't ground my club in a bunker, but that was just one situation I guess. Maybe I should have looked to the rule sheet a little harder,” Johnson said. “That's how it goes.”

We also were impressed with the way Johnson’s caddie Bobby Brown handled the heartbreak.

“I've thought long and hard, and I'll have to take a little heat,” Brown told the Myrtle Beach Sun News. “Maybe I should've known. I always read those sheets; I carry them in my yardage book in case there's a question. I've walked by bunkers every day, and I never thought that was a bunker. I thought it was a waste area. It looked like sand off the hill.”

From where “Cut Line” is sitting a week removed from the madness, it looks like golf’s version of a hanging chad.

Sean Foley. Whatever the status of his relationship with the world No. 1, it seems to be providing Tiger Woods with constructive feedback if not glimmers of hope.

Although Woods’ rounds of 71-70-72-73 at Whistling Straits were hardly a reason to celebrate, most Tour observers agree his action is “better,” whatever that means, and his putting (he didn’t take more than 29 putts for any round at the PGA) suggests the Barclays may be more than simply a Playoff cameo for the embattled star.

 If so, Foley would get co-Coach of the Year honors with Buck Showalter, the new Baltimore Orioles skipper who has the Birds inching their way out of the American League basement.
Made Cut-Did Not Finish (MDF)


Rory McIlroy. We love the kid – crazy game, engaging, mop of black curls spilling out from under the ball cap. Among the twentysomethings he is the most promising prospect both on and off the golf course, but we have to flag the Northern Irish-lad for his comments regarding Woods and the Ryder Cup.

Asked this week if he “fancies his chances (in a match)” against the world No. 1 McIlroy said, “Yeah I would, unless his game rapidly improves over the next few weeks. I think anyone on the European team would fancy their chances against him.”

Although he gets style points for his bravado, someone should remind McIlroy it is European captain Colin Montgomerie’s job to produce bulletin board fodder, and he’s very good at it.

Corey Pavin. Yes, we know, Tiger is on your short list of potential captain’s picks. It just seems Captain America is taking this coy schtick a bit too far.

Remove all the names from the potential picks and this is a non-story. Player W has 14 majors to his credit, has played on a combined 11 Ryder and Presidents Cup teams, has an impressive 3-1-1 Ryder Cup singles’ record and two top-5 finishes in majors this year.

By comparison, Players X, Y and Z (Nos. 9, 10 and 13 on the current points list) have one top-5 in 11 career majors, one top-5 of any kind this season and would be a Ryder Cup rookie, respectively.

You make the call.

Tweet of the week: @ogilviej (Joe Ogilvie) “I don’t know what is scarier, my putting today or the fact that the Federal Reserve will become second largest holder of U.S. dept by October.”
Missed Cut


PGA Tour. Not even “bridge” financing for at least one more year, 42 years of dedicated southern hospitality and one of the coziest setups this side of St. Andrews was enough to save the circuit’s Hilton Head Island, S.C., stop.

The Valero Texas Open will move into Hilton Head’s post-Masters date in 2011, although no commitments have been made beyond next year, and Harbour Town officials are hopeful a spot will open up elsewhere on the schedule but are still eyeing possible dates.

Still, “Cut Line” couldn’t help but revisit chief of operations Rick George’s comments before this year’s Heritage.

“This time of year is right after Augusta and the Masters. It makes a lot of sense, it's been a staple on Tour for the last 42 years, and we hope to be here another 42 years,” George said.

“I wouldn't say there’s other cities trying to take the tournament. Obviously we have every intention of being back here in 2011.”

That’s quite a 180 in less than four months. Either George was being less than forthcoming, or he was speaking completely out of school. You choose.

Herb Kohler and Pete Dye. To be fair, Kohler’s dream was to build America’s greatest golf resort and his slice of Wisconsin heaven certainly puts Whistling Straits and the American Club in the conversation among the nation’s best.

As a Grand Slam venue, however, the Straits Course is something less than ideal. In essence, there are 16 great holes – the par-5 fifth hole is a square peg in a collection of round holes and the 18th is best described as a work in progress – spoiled by a contrived collection of ornamental bunkers and enough hills to break a billy goat.

If the PGA of America is married to Whistling Straits as a venue, may we suggest the occasional PGA Professional National Championship. The club pros deserve a solid course and the fans deserve a break.
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NCAA DI Women's Champ.: Scoring, TV times

By Golf Channel DigitalMay 22, 2018, 5:00 pm

The NCAA Division I Women's Golf Championship is underway at Kartsen Creek Golf Club in Stillwater, Okla.

After three days of stroke play, eight teams have advanced to the match-play portion of the championship. Quarterfinals and semifinals will be contested on Tuesday, with the finals being held on Wednesday. Golf Channel is airing the action live.

Wake Forest junior Jennifer Kupcho won the individual title. Click here for live action, beginning at 4 p.m. ET.

Scoring:

TV Times (all times ET):

Tuesday
11AM-conclusion: Match-play quarterfinals (Click here to watch live)
4-8PM: Match-play semifinals

Wednesday
4-8PM: Match-play finals

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Davis: USGA learned from setup errors at Shinnecock

By Will GrayMay 22, 2018, 4:51 pm

With the U.S. Open set to return to Shinnecock Hills for the first time in 14 years, USGA executive director Mike Davis insists that his organization has learned from the setup mistakes that marred the event the last time it was played on the Southampton, N.Y., layout.

Retief Goosen held off Phil Mickelson to win his second U.S. Open back in 2004, but the lasting image from the tournament may have been tournament officials spraying down the seventh green by hand during the final round after the putting surface had become nearly unplayable. With the course pushed to the brink over the first three days, stiff winds sucked out any remaining moisture and players struggled to stay on the greens with 30-foot putts, let alone approach shots.

Speaking to repoters at U.S. Open media day, Davis offered candid reflections about the missteps that led to the course overshadowing the play during that infamous final round.

"I would just say that it was 14 years ago. It was a different time, it was different people, and we as an organzation, we learned from it," Davis said. "When you set up a U.S. Open, it is golf's ultimate test. It's probably set up closer to the edge than any other event in golf, and I think that the difference then versus now is we have a lot more technology, a lot more data in our hands.

"And frankly, ladies and gentlemen, what really happened then was just a lack of water."

Davis pointed to enhancements like firmness and moisture readings for the greens that weren't available in 2004, and he noted that meterological data has evolved in the years since. With another chance to get his hands on one of the USGA's favorite venues, he remains confident that tournament officials will be able to better navigate the thin line between demanding and impossible this time around.

"There are parts that I think we learned from, and so I think we're happy that we have a mulligan this time," Davis said. "It was certainly a bogey last time. In fact maybe even a double bogey, and equitable stroke control perhaps kicked in."

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UCLA junior Vu named WGCA Player of the Year

By Golf Channel DigitalMay 22, 2018, 3:23 pm

UCLA junior Lilia Vu was named Player of the Year on Tuesday by the Women’s Golf Coaches Association (WGCA).

Vu recorded the lowest full-season scoring average (70.37) in UCLA history. Her four tournament wins tied the school record for most victories in a single season.

Vu was also named to the WGCA All-America first team. Here's a look at the other players who joined her on the prestigious list:

WGCA First Team All-Americans

  • Maria Fassi, Junior, University of Arkansas
  • Kristen Gillman, Sophomore, University of Alabama
  • Jillian Hollis, Junior, University of Georgia
  • Cheyenne Knight, Junior, University of Alabama
  • Jennifer Kupcho, Junior, Wake Forest University
  • Andrea Lee, Sophomore, Stanford University
  • Leona Maguire, Senior, Duke University
  • Sophia Schubert, Senior, University of Texas
  • Lauren Stephenson, Junior, University of Alabama
  • Maddie Szeryk, Senior, Texas A&M University
  • Patty Tavatanakit, Freshman, UCLA
  • Lilia Vu, Junior, UCLA
Chris Stroud and caddie Casey Clendenon Getty Images

Stroud's caddie wins annual PGA Tour caddie tournament

By Rex HoggardMay 22, 2018, 3:15 pm

Casey Clendenon, who caddies for Chris Stroud, won the gross division of the annual PGA Tour caddie tournament on Monday, shooting a 5-under 66 at Trinity Forest Golf Club, site of last week’s AT&T Byron Nelson.

Scott Tway (65), who caddies for Brian Harman, won the net division by two strokes over Wayne Birch, Troy Merritt’s caddie.

Kyle Bradley, Jonathan Byrd’s caddie, took second place with a 71 in the gross division.

The tournament was organized by the Association of Professional Tour Caddies, and proceeds from the event went to two charities. The APTC donated $20,000 to Greg Chalmers’ charity, MAXimumChances.org, which aids families living with autism. The association also donated $10,000 to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.