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Peterson-Gribble defy odds in alternate shot

By Ryan LavnerApril 27, 2018, 9:11 pm

AVONDALE, La. – No format strikes fear in proud PGA Tour players like alternate shot, so the idea of two slumping pros teaming up on a hazard-ridden course?

No one of sound mind would sign up for that.

And yet John Peterson and Cody Gribble have approached this Zurich Classic with short memories, with the nonchalance of a member-member and the belief in each other that can only be earned after nearly 20 years of friendship.

For anyone else, there’d be reasons to fret here at TPC Louisiana: Playing on a major medical extension, Peterson has only four events remaining to make more than $300,000. If he doesn’t, he’s putting away his clubs – for good. His partner, Gribble, won in his rookie season but doesn’t have a top-10 since, is statistically one of the worst players on Tour this season and enters this week with seven consecutive missed cuts.

But there they are, near the top of the leaderboard, only three shots back, after shooting 68 in alternate shot – the format that’s supposed to expose those who are struggling.

“It’s a relaxed atmosphere,” Peterson explained afterward. “It’s a really hard format, but it can be a lot harder if you barely know the guy. If you barely know the guy and hit a bad shot, you’re gonna feel way worse than if you’re gonna go drink beers with him after the round no matter what.”

Peterson and Gribble have known each other since they were 10, growing up in the Fort Worth area. For two decades, they’ve hunted and fished and never taken themselves too seriously. When asked if they had any fun memories from their amateur golf days, Gribble wondered aloud if they’d roomed together for the Porter Cup. “If we did,” Peterson said, “then I wouldn’t remember it.” Their walk-up song on the first tee Saturday is George Michael’s “Careless Whisper,” if only because it was the most ridiculous song Peterson could think of. (Their backup choice: “Hakuna Matata.”) Their idea of a perfect day isn’t spent on the course – it’s on Gribble’s land in West Texas, with a bow and a beer.


Zurich Classic of New Orleans: Articles, photos and videos


“I love golf, and I love what I do,” Gribble said, “but I love being away from it at the same time. That’s something we have a lot in common.”

And it’s the mindset they’ve needed to navigate the travails of pro golf.

A former NCAA champion, Peterson’s career has been derailed by a wrist injury. He’s been pain-free for the past eight months but “just haven’t played like it.” He’s also felt the pull of home more than ever. He got married a few years ago. He and his wife welcomed a baby boy late last year, and he’s rarely slept more than a few hours each night.

“I enjoy my time at home much more than I do my time out here,” he said. “It’s not frustrating for me to miss a cut. It’s obviously frustrating because you’re not getting paid or feeling the competitive juices, but I love being at home.”

The clock is ticking on his career. Including this week, he has only four more events to earn 239 FedExCup points or $332,712. Not that he’s concerned. He’s already planning for life after golf, lining up a gig with some buddies in Fort Worth to get into commercial real estate and business development.

“We’re gonna see how it all pans out,” he said.

Gribble, meanwhile, is trying to work his way out of a miserable slump. He ranks 182nd in driving accuracy and 201st in strokes gained: tee to green, but because he’s exempt through next season after his win at the 2016 Sanderson Farms, he at least has time to figure it out.

“It’s been slow,” he said. “Really slow. … I don’t think anybody is shocked that I’m a streaky player, but you just have to believe that if you put in the work, it’s going to pay off.”

Gribble and Peterson, who have combined for no top-10s in the past 18 months, set two rules for this week: 1.) Have a blast, which for them is never a problem; and 2.) No apologies.

They thought they had a smart game plan, with Peterson taking the even holes, but no one could have expected them to follow their opening 66 with a 4-under round Friday in the tricky alternate-shot format.

“We’re extremely happy,” Peterson said.

Interestingly, the top of the leaderboard is littered with players who arrived in New Orleans in poor form.

Leader Michael Kim (who is teaming with Andrew Putnam) doesn’t have a top-20 in the past 15 months.

Daniel Summerhays (with Tony Finau) has banked only $53,000 this season.

Nate Lashley and Rob Oppenheim are Nos. 161 and 163, respectively, in the FedExCup.

Chad Campbell and Matt Jones each described their seasons as “pretty poor” and “terrible” – they’ve combined to miss as many cuts (13) as they’ve made – and yet they’re also in the mix here.

“Maybe just being with him, knowing he’s confident in me, maybe gives each of us more confidence,” Campbell said.

And perhaps that’s at work with Peterson and Gribble, too.

After their rounds Friday, they were asked whether this format was just what they needed.

“To break our current hot streak?” Gribble said, laughing. “We’ll tell you on Sunday.”

“Yeah,” Peterson said, jumping in, “let’s wait a couple of days. We’re only halfway done.”

Then they headed off for the clubhouse, for lunch and the post-round beers they had promised, no matter what happened.

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How the new Tour Championship format would look this year and last

By Golf Channel DigitalSeptember 18, 2018, 2:39 pm

The PGA Tour announced on Tuesday plans to change the FedExCup format for the 2018-19 season. Part of that plan is to assign pre-tournament strokes to players in the Tour Championship based on their playoff standings in the first two events. 

Per GolfChannel.com senior writer Rex Hoggard:

The No. 1 player on the post-season points list will begin the finale at 10 under par. The next four players will start at 8 under through 5 under, respectively, while Nos. 6-10 will begin the tournament at 4 under par with the total regressing by one stroke every five players with those ranked 26th through 30thstarting at even par. The winner at East Lake will also claim the FedExCup.

Here's a look at where players would start this year's Tour Championship under the new format (through the three events already contested):

1 Bryson DeChambeau 10 under
2 Justin Rose 8 under
3 Tony Finau 7 under
4 Dustin Johnson 6 under
5 Justin Thomas 5 under
T-6 Keegan Bradley 4 under
T-6 Brooks Koepka 4 under
T-6 Bubba Watson 4 under
T-6 Billy Horschel 4 under
T-6 Cameron Smith 4 under
T-11 Webb Simpson 3 under
T-11 Jason Day 3 under
T-11 Francesco Molinari 3 under
T-11 Phil Mickelson 3 under
T-11 Patrick Reed 3 under
T-16 Patrick Cantlay 2 under
T-16 Rory McIlroy 2 under
T-16 Xander Schauffele 2 under
T-16 Tommy Fleetwood 2 under
T-16 Tiger Woods 2 under
T-21 Aaron Wise 1 under
T-21 Kevin Na 1 under
T-21 Rickie Fowler 1 under
T-21 Jon Rahm 1 under
T-21 Kyle Stanley 1 under
T-26 Paul Casey Even par
T-26 Hideki Matsuyama Even par
T-26 Gary Woodland Even par
T-26 Marc Leishman Even par
T-26 Patton Kizzire Even par

Here's a look at how last year's Tour Championship played out, with Xander Schauffele winning the event and Justin Thomas claiming the overall FedExCup title, and how it would have looked, all things equal, under the new system (in which Jordan Spieth began the finale as the No. 1 seed and would have started the event at 10 under par).

2017 Tour Championship Player Final score   2017 in new system Player Final score
1 Xander Schauffele -12   1 Justin Thomas  -19
2 Justin Thomas  -11    2 Jordan Spieth  -17 
T-3 Russell Henley  -10    3 Paul Casey  -13 
T-3 Kevin Kisner  -10    T-4 Jon Rahm  -12 
5 Paul Casey  -9    T-4 Brooks Koepka  -12 
6 Brooks Koepka  -8    T-4 Kevin Kisner  -12 
T-7 Tony Finau  -7    T-4 Xander Schauffele   -12
T-7 Jon Rahm  -7    T-8 Justin Rose  -10 
T-7 Jordan Spieth  -7    T-8 Russell Henley  -10 
T-10 Sergio Garcia  -6    T-10 Dustin Johnson  -9 
T-10 Matt Kuchar  -6    T-10 Matt Kuchar  -9 
T-10 Justin Rose  -6    12 Tony Finau  -8 
T-13 Patrick Reed  -5    T-13 Daniel Berger  -7 
T-13 Webb Simpson  -5    T-13 Webb Simpson  -7 
15 Daniel Berger  -4    T-13 Sergio Garcia  -7 
16 Pat Perez  -3    T-16 Pat Perez  -6 
T-17 Jason Day  -2    T-16 Patrick Reed -6 
T-17 Dustin Johnson  -2    18 Marc Leishman  -3
19 Gary Woodland  -1     T-19 Kyle Stanley  -1 
T-20 Patrick Cantlay    T-19 Gary Woodland  -1 
T-20 Jason Dufner    T-21 Jason Day 
T-20 Kyle Stanley  E   T-21 Adam Hadwin 
23 Adam Hadwin  +1   T-21 Patrick Cantlay 
T-24 Brian Harman  +3    T-21 Jason Dufner 
T-24 Marc Leishman  +3    25 Brian Harman  +1 
T-26 Rickie Fowler +6    T-26 Rickie Fowler  +2 
T-26 Hideki Matsuyama  +6    T-26 Hideki Matsuyama  +2 
T-28 Kevin Chappell  +9    28 Charley Hoffman  +6 
T-28 Charley Hoffman  +9    29 Kevin Chappell  +7 
30 Jnonattan Vegas  +10    30 Jhonattan Vegas  +8 
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Stock Watch: Up or down for FedExCup changes?

By Ryan LavnerSeptember 18, 2018, 2:20 pm

Each week on GolfChannel.com, we’ll examine which players’ stocks and trends are rising and falling in the world of golf.

RISING

Angela Stanford (+9%): In this era of youthful dominance, Justin Rose and now Stanford offer reminders that sometimes the long, winding journey is even more rewarding. It took Rose 20 years to reach world No. 1; for Stanford, she needed 76 major starts (and 15 years after a major playoff loss) before she finally became a Grand Slam winner, at age 40.

Sang-Moon Bae (+6%): The next time you complain about losing your game after a few weeks away, remember that the two-time Tour winner shelved his clubs for TWO YEARS to fulfill his South Korean military obligations and then regained his card. That’s a heckuva achievement.

FedExCup changes (+5%): Though the Tour Championship shouldn’t count as an official victory – come on, the playoffs leader has a TEN-SHOT head start over No. 26! – the strokes-based system is no doubt easier to follow than the various points fluctuations. RIP, Steve Sands’ whiteboard.

Tyler McCumber (+3%): Maybe he’s on his way to challenging his famous father, who won 10 times on the PGA Tour. A three-time winner this season in Canada, McCumber clinched Mackenzie Tour Player of the Year honors and will be one to watch next year on the Web.

Matthew Wolff (+2%): The reigning NCAA Freshman of the Year is now 2-for-2 this season, winning at both Pebble Beach and Olympia Fields with a 67.2 scoring average. He’s a primetime player.  


FALLING

Amy Olson (-1%): To win a major most need to have their heart broken at least once … but that ugly 72nd-hole double bogey could linger for longer than she probably hoped.  

Lexi (-2%): As heartwarming as it was to watch Stanford snap her major-less drought, keep in mind that the best U.S. player – the 23-year-old Thompson – next April will be five years removed from her lone LPGA major title.

Web final (-3%): Twenty-five Tour cards will be on the line this week at the season-ending Web.com Tour Championship, but here’s guessing you won’t even notice – for some reason, it conflicts with the big tour’s season finale. Why couldn’t this have been played last week, when the Tour was dark and the Web could get some much-needed exposure?

Player of the Year debate (-5%): As much as the Tour might promote otherwise during its big-money conclusion, Justin Thomas said it best on Twitter: Majors trump all. It’s Brooks Koepka’s trophy this year.  

Repairing damage (-6%): Golf’s governing bodies are confident that the new rules (out Jan. 1!) will speed up pace of play, but it’s hard to see how that’s possible when they now will allow players to tap down spike marks on the green. With $1 million and major titles on the line, you don’t think guys will spend an extra minute or two gardening?

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FedExCup gets massive overhaul for next season

By Rex HoggardSeptember 18, 2018, 2:05 pm

ATLANTA – The PGA Tour unveiled more dramatic changes to the FedExCup and its playoffs on Tuesday, outlining a new model to determine the season-long champion and giving a boost to the circuit’s regular season.

Starting next year when the Tour transitions from four post-season events to three, the FedExCup champion will be determined solely on the outcome at the Tour Championship, with players beginning the week at East Lake with a predetermined total based on their position on the points list.

The No. 1 player on the post-season points list will begin the finale at 10 under par. The next four players will start at 8 under through 5 under, respectively, while Nos. 6-10 will begin the tournament at 4 under par with the total regressing by one stroke every five players with those ranked 26th through 30th starting at even par. The winner at East Lake will also claim the FedExCup.


Current FedExCup standings

Tour Championship: Articles, photos and videos


The new system removes the confusing calculations that have highlighted the finale since the season-long race began in 2007 and avoids awkward moments like last year when Xander Schauffele won the Tour Championship but Justin Thomas claimed the FedExCup.

“As soon as the Tour Championship begins, any fan – no matter if they’ve followed the PGA Tour all season or are just tuning in for the final event – can immediately understand what’s going on and what’s at stake for every single player in the field,” commissioner Jay Monahan said in a statement.

A player’s rank on the points list will be based on their play in the first two playoff events, The Northern Trust (125 players) and BMW Championship (70 players), and a victory at East Lake will count as an official triumph, although it remains to be seen if players will receive world ranking points at what is essentially a handicapped event.

The Tour also announced the addition of a regular-season bonus pool called the Wyndham Rewards Top 10. The $10 million bonus pool will be based on regular-season performance, with the No. 1 player on the points list after the Wyndham Championship, the final regular-season event, earning $2 million.

In addition to the format changes at the Tour Championship and regular-season race, Monahan announced that the FedExCup bonus pool will increase to $60 million, up from $35 million, with the champion receiving $15 million.

“Now is the time to make these changes,” Monahan said, “and thanks to significant input in the process by our players, partners and fans, I believe we’re making exactly the right moves.”

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Congressional to host 2031 PGA, 2036 Ryder Cup

By Will GraySeptember 18, 2018, 12:51 pm

The PGA of America announced that Congressional Country Club will host a number of its biggest events over the next two decades, including the 2031 PGA Championship and 2036 Ryder Cup.

Located near Washington, D.C., Congressional hosted the 1976 PGA Championship when Dave Stockton won. But it's perhaps more well known in recent years as a USGA venue, having hosted three U.S. Opens including 1964 (Ken Venturi), 1997 (Ernie Els) and 2011 (Rory McIlroy). The course also hosted the Quicken Loans National seven times between 2007-2016.

But the famed Blue Course will now become a PGA of America venue, and down the line will host the organization's two biggest events. Before that, Congressional will be home to the KPMG Women's PGA Championship in both 2022 and 2027, KitchenAid Senior PGA Championship in 2025 and 2033, the Junior PGA Championship in 2024 and the PGA Professional Championship in 2029.

The announcement is a win for golf fans in the nation's capital, as the area lost its regular PGA Tour stop when the former Quicken Loans National ended this summer. Quicken Loans will sponsor the new Rocket Mortgage Classic in Detroit beginning in 2019.

The Wanamaker Trophy will again be up for grabs at Congressional in 2031, adding to the long list of already confirmed future PGA Championship venues. The event now has only three open dates (2025, 2026, 2030) before 2032, but has already promised one of those available spots to Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa.

The biggest prize may require the longest wait, as Congressional will host the Ryder Cup for the first time in 2036. It's the third time in less than a year that the PGA has locked in a future Ryder Cup site, having added Hazeltine (2028) earlier this year and Olympic (2032) in November. The 2020 matches will be held at Whistling Straits, while the 2024 matches will go to Bethpage Black.