Proforce VTS shafts emphasize torque

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The Proforce name has been a familiar one to golfers ever since Jose Maria Olazabal used the original gold and purple version of that shaft in his driver to win the 1999 Masters. And the folks at UST Mamiya have continued to roll out new iterations of that product ever since.

The most recent version is the Proforce VTS. Introduced to the professional tours last year, it was made available to the golf public for the first time in early 2012 and has already amassed some big tournament wins, including this years U.S. Open. At the same time, the shaft has generated some buzz among recreational players.

While VTS stands for Velocity, Torque and Speed, the real story behind the newest Proforce is its emphasis on torque and the ways that golfers can not only increase ball speed when torque is adjusted to fit their swing styles but also control dispersion of their drives, as well as shots off their fairway metals and hybrids.

This shaft is as much about the importance of fitting and understanding what a big influence torque has on ball speed and shot dispersion for tour players and recreational golfers alike, says Danny Le, marketing manager for UST Mamiya.

What the specialists at UST discovered in the development of the VTS was that once they found the right weight and flex for golfers through individual fitting processes, they could dial in torque in such a way as to increase ball speed by as much as 6 mph. This can translate to a boost in distance from 15 to 18 yards and decrease dispersion by as much as 30 yards for vastly improved accuracy. Torque, they came to believe, was by no means a one-size-fits-all proposition.

Proforce VTS shafts are available for drivers and fairway metals in five different weights (55, 65, 75, 85 and 95 grams) and three torques: low (black), mid (silver) and high (red). The Proforce VTS shafts for hybrids are offered in those same three torques and also in three different weights (75, 85 and 100 grams).